I. Translation/Interpretation  

A. What is the Difference between Interpretation and Translation?

B. How do I know I am receiving a quality translation?


C. What is your translation process?

D. What if there are changes to the translation after we get the final copy?

E. How do I order an Interpreter?

F. What is Localization?

G. What is Translation?

H. What is Internationalization?

I. What is Globalization?

 

II. The Technical Part

A. What software applications are you experienced in?

B. What languages do you translate?

C. What industries are you able to localize for?

 

III. The Tools

A. What is Machine Translation?

B. What is CAT?

C. What is Translation Memory?

 

 

  Questions & Answers  
I. Translation/Interpretation

A. What is the difference between interpreation and translation?
Translation is the written form of transferring one language to an other. Interpretation is the verbal or spoken form of transferring from one language to an other.

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B. How do I know I am receiving a quality translation?
The companies you are working with should require a minimum of two language professionals reviewing and editing all your translated materials. The language professionals should be familiar with the subject area and native or emerged in the culture/country for several years. ITB allows the client one review and revision to return after final copy for no additional costs.

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C. What is your translation process?
It is a very detailed process and it depends on the size and the intent of the material. We require a minimum of two language professionals on any one project, regardless of the size. We hire people who have an understanding of the material being translated. All workers are either culturally from the target language country or have spent a significant amount of time studying and emerged in the culture. Inside the office is where most of the work is done. This way we have control over the project and timelines. Once a project is delivered to the customer, the customer can have the material reviewed by an other person to find any mistakes. We allow those suggested changes to return to our agency for revisions at no cost (under time constraints). We do this because no matter how many people look at a translation, mistakes or different interpretations of the text is evident.

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D. What if there are changes to the translation after we get the final copy?
See the translation process above for description.

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E. How do I order an Interpreter?
Contact ITB representative. We take order via fax, telephone or email. If you intend to use the service frequently, please mention for discount. A form will be sent to you for order an interpreter.

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F. What is Localization?
Localization is the process of adapting a product for use in specific markets and countries. It takes into consideration cultural and linguistic conventions, translation, changing graphics, adapting documentation, etc.

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G. What is Translation?
Translation is the process of converting words from one language to another. Translation requires an understanding of the source language context in order to convey the same understanding in the target language.

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H. What is Internationalization?
Internationalization is the process of designing and building a product, from the beginning of the development cycle, that it can be easily adapted for specific markets and countries with minimal changes.

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I. What is Globalization?
Globalization is the process a company uses to create products that can be used successfully in several markets without modification of any kind. It combines internationalization and localization. To develop globalize products we recommend that our clients globalize their company as well. This suggests that they integrate internationalization strategies and procedures in every department, from sales and marketing to engineering, technical writing, marketing communications, customer education, training, packaging, sales and product support, administration, legal and finance.

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II. The Technical Part

A. What applications are you experienced in?

  • Multilingual Web Sites and Web Publishing
  • Multilingual Marketing Communications
  • Environmental, chemical and safety standards, etc.
  • Multilingual Technical Documentation - instruction manuals, users' guides, on-line help
  • Multilingual Training Materials - tutorials, multimedia applications
  • Multilingual Documentation - medical, financial, legal, compliance

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B. What languages do you translate?
ITB has extensive resources, experience, and expertise in the following languages:

English (for US and UK), German, French (France and Canada), Spanish (Spain and South America), Italian, Dutch, Portuguese (Portugal and Brazil), Russian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese (Traditional and Simplified), Thai, Indonesian, Malay, Hmong, Lao, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Bengali, Burmese, Pilipino (Tagalog), Swedish, Danish, Finnish, Norwegian, Eastern European languages, Somali, Amharic, Swahili, Tigrinya, Farsi, Nuer, Urdu, Arabic, Bosnian, Hindu, Bulgarian, and over 100 more.

Please inquire for language not listed.

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C. What industries are you able to localize for?
Information Technology, Telecommunications, Financial, Publishing, eCommerce, Internet

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III. The Tools

A. What is Machine Translation?
Machine translation is the process by which a machine translates text from one language to another. This is accomplished by breaking down sentence structure, identifying parts of speech, attempting to resolve any ambiguities and then translating the components and structure into the target language.

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B. What is CAT?
CAT is an acronym for Computer Aided Translation also known as Machine Aided Translation. By incorporating translation memory and/or machine translation CAT frees a translator from translating repetitive information and enables higher productivity.

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C. What is Translation Memory?
Translation memory is a database that contains precisely matched pairs of source and target language text. The advantage of maintaining a translation memory is that this information can be used to reduce translation time and cost and improve consistency when localizing the text.

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